HFMD precautions for children that every parent needs to know

HFMD precautions for children that every parent needs to know

Everything you need to know about HFMD and its preventive measures

HFMD

The surge of Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease (HFMD) in Malaysia has become a matter of serious concern. The country is on alert as more than 33,000 cases have been recorded nationwide to date. Children under the age of five are highly susceptible to the disease with cases being reported at daycares, nurseries and kindergartens across the country.

Here’s what you need to know about HFMD.

What is HFMD?

HFMD or the Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease is a contagious infection caused by viruses from the Enterovirus genus, most commonly Coxsackievirus A16 and Enterovirus 71. The virus is found in secretions from the nose and throat such as nasal mucus or saliva, blister fluid and stool.

How does HFMD spread?

The disease spreads by direct contact with the infected person, the air after sneeze or cough of an infected person or touching your eyes, nose or mouth with unwashed hands after coming in contact with contaminated surfaces or feces.

What are the symptoms of the disease?

Though it usually affects infants and children below the age of 5, it can also occur in adults and older children. The signs and symptoms of the disease generally include fever, loss of appetite, headache, sore throat, red rashes on the palms of hands and the soles of the feet, and irritability. It usually begins with fever and red rashes or blisters are observed in the following days.

Though every infected person might not suffer from all of the symptoms, it is good to seek medical attention if you observe any of these signs in your children.

A little boy wearing a white t-shirt thinking about something sadly due to hfmd.

How is the disease diagnosed?

The hand, foot and mouth disease can be diagnosed through physical examination by the doctor who will check the appearance of common symptoms. The doctor or health care professional may also collect a sample from the infected person’s throat or stool to test for the virus.

What precautions can be taken to prevent HFMD?

The Health Ministry has been informing the people about the current situation of the HFMD outbreak and the health authorities have advised the people, especially the parents to play an active role in the control and prevention on the disease starting from themselves and their homes. Parents can take these precautions to prevent the disease.

Wash hands regularly

The best way to prevent HFMD is to practice good hygiene both inside and outside the house. Washing your hands on a regular basis can reduce the chances of coming in contact with the virus. Teach the children to wash hands before eating, after using the washroom and after coming home from outside.

A toddler wearing a blue shirt lying near a blue toy bus due to hfmd.

Disinfect the home

Make sure that all the shared places in the house are cleaned on a regular basis by using a disinfectant. It is also important to keep objects like toys and pacifiers clean as they may be contaminated with the virus. Teach the children not to put any toys, other objects or their fingers in their mouth.

Do not ignore symptoms

Parents should not ignore symptoms like fever, vomiting, rashes or lethargy in the child. Please take your child to the nearby healthcare centre and get the required treatment. Also, do not take the children with HFMD or possible symptoms to any public places, daycare, kindergarten or schools as it might spread the disease to others.

Avoid sharing food and other items

It is good to avoid sharing food, drinks, utensils, clothes, toys, towels and similar objects with others during this time.

What precautions can be taken by preschools?

Considering the fact that HFMD majorly affects children under the age of 5 and is easily spread in places where children gather such as kindergartens and daycare, preschools have a major role to the play in the control and prevention of the disease.

  • Preschools should take special care to maintain high standards of hygiene and both at a personal and environmental level. Teachers and staff are advised to wash their hands on a regular basis, especially after using the washroom, changing the diapers of children or accidentally touching the blisters.
  • All the objects, toys or materials used by children including the floor and the toilets should be cleaned and disinfected regularly.
  • There should be a proper facility for the disposal or waste and diapers to reduce the risk of the disease.
  • Schools are recommended to conduct screening for any HFMD symptoms before the children enter the premises.
The best possible start for your child at The children’s house

The best possible start for your child at The children’s house

Montessori learning through The children’s house

Every child is unique and is filled with an enthusiasm to explore the world around them. Each day in a child’s life is filled with the curiosity to learn something new. Hence, it is important that they find a caring environment that guides them on their individual path and inculcates a love for learning in them. This can only happen in a prepared environment where the child gets to work with materials that entice and engross his mind.

The children’s house recognises the uniqueness of your child and is as passionate about your little one as you are. Children in their first stage of development from 0 to 6 years are like learning sponges. They have incredible powers of absorption and every new thing that they experience during the early years is crucial for their physical, social, emotional and intellectual development.

A group of toddlers having lunch together on a dining table with montessori.

Creating a loving and secure environment

The children’s house focuses on getting it right from the very beginning. We understand that your child needs to go through a separation from the caregiver in order to socialise and enter into a new routine of going to school. Hence, the Infant and the Pre-tots programme aim to provide a secure and loving environment for your child through a foundation of Caregiving, Play and Attachment in the curriculum.

While caregiving ensures respectful and responsive interactions with the infants and pre-tots, play greatly helps the children learn unconsciously. The programme includes engaging activities like Tots Art, Tots Music, Tots Read, Tots Gym, Tots Sensory Play and Sunshine Tots. Through a wide range of interesting activities, your child will acquire cognitive abilities, language skills, improved physical abilities, social and emotional skills required to be an active part of this world. Every activity is designed exclusively to stimulate the curiosity of your little ones as he progresses to the Toddler age group.

A child-centred approach to education

The environment at The children’s house is completely centred around your child. The Montessori method of teaching at Toddler, Preschool and Kindergarten levels provide a nurturing and non-competitive environment that focuses on the individual needs and development of every child. The school ensures that your child gets all the care and attention by keeping low teacher child ratios coupled with well-planned classrooms to avoid overcrowding. Trust is fostered through care and participation in activities like putting away toys and returning materials back to their places.

It encourages self-education, where children learn in a prepared environment, that provides them with activities and presents opportunities for exploration, investigation and problem-solving. Children are given the freedom to choose their activity and have the responsibility of returning the materials to their places. These experiences not only give the child a sense of security but also stimulate intelligence and promote physical and psychological development. Their natural desire to succeed is encouraged by repetitive activities which help them perfect the art until they achieve a great sense of satisfaction and joy.

A child jumping in a sack in the playground with montessori.

Learning through a variety of engaging materials

Children are provided with an encouraging environment with materials aimed at covering all areas of development. The didactic apparatus is specially designed for every level of childhood development. They start from being simple and gradually move on to more complex materials. For example from colour box 1 (primary colours) for level 1 to colour box 2 (secondary colours) for level 2  and colour box 3 (shades of secondary colours) for level 3. In this way, children learn to advance smoothly from one level to another without being perplexed by missing links.

Programmes at every level in The children’s house aim to prepare your child for a smooth transition to the next level. Each activity is carefully designed to enhance the all-round development of your child. Given the fact that 90% of the brain development of a child happens before the age of five, it is important to understand that preschool is much more than just playing. Children start with concrete experiences and move on to abstract at a later stage. Concrete thinking is important for mental development as it provides a base for abstract thinking. Concrete experiences not only give children the ability to reason beyond limits but also help them interpret better.

Rich learning experience through Montessori 

By working independently on a wide variety of materials in a Montessori environment, children learn to make choices and develop problem-solving skills as they advance from one level to another. Their young minds first learn to explore, gradually developing the ability for abstract thinking. While the basic educational benefits of preschool (such as literacy and numeracy) are tangible, the advances children achieve towards becoming well-rounded individuals are truly invaluable.

The children’s house provides your child with an environment in which a skilled observer (teacher) gives him the freedom needed to orientate his personality while helping him maintain self-control. Above all, through all the activities we not only respect the individuality of your child but they also learn to respect the teachers and other children.

The ultimate guide to discussing the elections with your children

The ultimate guide to discussing the elections with your children

Helping children cope with curiosity about elections

As parents, we all want our children to grow up to be responsible citizens of the country, actively participating in the growth of the nation. We can often resort to over protecting them from various ideologies instead of educating them in a way that helps them differentiate between the positive and the negative.

They already know ‘elections’

Whether you like it or not, children have overheard and picked up a lot of information from the conversations happening around them. Be it small discussions with friends, learning about parliament in the classroom or listening to your conversation at the lunch table, kids ‘know’ a lot more than you realise.

Most often than not, kids are also aware of many political issues because of the news doing its rounds on the television and through social media. Hence, instead of picking up bits and pieces of information from elsewhere, it is good to engage kids in useful topics and stories, age appropriately of course. In this way, they will learn how to discern and differentiate between fact and fiction.

Ease fears through awareness

There is much activity that comes along with every election. People organise rallies, protests and the media covers all the excitement and confusion 24/7. We all know that these topics often induce a feeling of fear and bewilderment in kids who may not be so comfortable with a politically charged environment.

Younger children may get worried as they have a short attention span and often pick up only the alarming bits of information from a conversation. There are many things they do not know and when they are unable to understand the matter, it might create unnecessary distress in their minds. Telling them about the situation creates context and it will help them understand some important issues of today without being fearful or anxious.

Present views respectfully

A lot of time we watch election candidates engaging in heated debates where they choose poor communication methods when disagreeing with each other. Such instances can be used as opportunities to explain to kids about respecting the views of others and teaching them how to express their discontent in the right way.

Kids need to understand that we are bound to disagree with each other on certain issues but what matters the most is the way we choose to disagree. In this way, kids will learn how to have an opinion and at the same time respect the view of others.

Mother researching about elctions on the laptop with her young children on her lap.

A sense of social responsibility

Teaching them about politics doesn’t mean you should indoctrinate your kids, it is about inculcating a sense of responsibility in them. While they learn concepts like justice and equality in the classroom, answering their questions about the importance of voting can help them become socially responsible citizens in future.

Young children might find it difficult to understand the complexity of the political system but they do understand the basic concepts of fairness or justice, which form an important part of  democracy.

You can teach the children little facts about the role of a parliamentarian or prime minister. Voting can also be made easy and fun to understand by creating opportunities for children to learn the mechanism; they can vote for the location of the next family holiday or what game to play on game night.

With older children, who understand about the government and different political parties, you can teach them about democracy, history of the nation and patriotism.

Fun activities with kids

Young children mostly learn through imitation. Hence, you can take them with you when you go to the polls (just not inside the voting booth!) or for a visit to historical sites and museums where learning can be fun. Get involved in issues which affect the lives of others such as conservation of natural resources, improving education for the less privileged or other volunteering activities that you are interested in.

Though these things do not relate directly to politics or voting, children learn a lot about how small acts can make a big difference in the lives of others. In older children, the learning deepens as they read stories and explore the history of their nation. Eventually, they will also participate in debates or discussions at school and develop an interest in volunteering for various activities and causes.

Learning about politics or history doesn’t have to be dull or inflict fear. Engaging your child in conversations that are interesting and thoughtful, and visits to historical sites and museums, will make them aware of their social responsibility as citizens of the country and they will eventually understand the different facets of politics.